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The End of the DVD Wars

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 Toshiba will no longer develop, make or market HD DVD. This makes Blu-ray (backed by Sony & Panasonic and five major Hollywood movie studios) the winner in the battle over high-def. The HD DVD camp included Microsoft, Intel Corp and NEC Corp. So you could also conclude the consumer electronics boys outmaneuvered the IT guys in this war.

Toshiba says the pivotal point was when Warner Bros. decided to release movie only in Blu-ray, so content was a key factor. Retail played its role: WalMart’s decision to go exclusively with BluRay and Netflix (the US rental king) also created critical mass for Blu-Ray.

Every war has victims: an estimated 1 million people already bought HD DVD machines and videos. Other victims included the entire channel as we all suffer when vendors can’t agree on standards.

Go The Surrender Document

The Resurgence of Powerline

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Running the network across inexpensive electrical wiring instead of cable, fiber or copper was such a simple idea that I.T. executives sniffed it away. Now “PowerLine” is back and its commercial “voltage” is simply humming. PowerLine is gaining ground because utility companies are developing "smart grids" to meet regional mandates to conserve on energy. In some parts of the world, these utility grids already support streaming to home devices through a mix of Broadband-over-powerline on large utility power lines and low-speed communications on standard electrical wiring in and around the house.

At both Connected Home Europe and at CES, you could see the sparks from PowerLine. IO Gear, GigaFast, Tatung, and Russound -- each showed their own new PowerLine audio systems.

And, at CES 2008, Sharp became the first company to prototype a product that can stream two simultaneous HD feeds and internet content over existing power lines.

Sharp’s Network AQUOS uses PowerLine Communication modems to connect the TV and PC, and transmit high-quality audio, video and online content over Homeplug AV, a high-speed networking standard. At its booth, Sharp showed how you can watch NASCAR, for example, on an AQUOS high-def LCD TV, and simultaneously download ticket information and directions (via Yahoo! Maps) through the computer and view it in the living room, without getting up off the couch--all through power lines.

Go Sharp’s Network AQUOS

The Resurgence of Powerline

E-mail Print PDF

Running the network across inexpensive electrical wiring instead of cable, fiber or copper was such a simple idea that I.T. executives sniffed it away. Now “PowerLine” is back and its commercial “voltage” is simply humming. PowerLine is gaining ground because utility companies are developing "smart grids" to meet regional mandates to conserve on energy. In some parts of the world, these utility grids already support streaming to home devices through a mix of Broadband-over-powerline on large utility power lines and low-speed communications on standard electrical wiring in and around the house.

At both Connected Home Europe and at CES, you could see the sparks from PowerLine. IO Gear, GigaFast, Tatung, and Russound -- each showed their own new PowerLine audio systems.

And, at CES 2008, Sharp became the first company to prototype a product that can stream two simultaneous HD feeds and internet content over existing power lines.

Sharp’s Network AQUOS uses PowerLine Communication modems to connect the TV and PC, and transmit high-quality audio, video and online content over Homeplug AV, a high-speed networking standard. At its booth, Sharp showed  how you can watch NASCAR, for example, on an AQUOS high-def LCD TV, and simultaneously download ticket information and directions (via Yahoo! Maps) through the computer and view it in the living room, without getting up off the couch--all through power lines.

Go Sharp’s Network AQUOS

Service Provider Home Networks: 71m Households by 2012

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Service providers are rapidly increasing their deployments of residential gateways for connected home applications, says a new report by Parks Associates. The number of households worldwide with service provider-deployed residential gateway solutions could grow to more than 71m by Q4 2012.

 “Service providers worldwide are scrambling to add value to broadband, communications, and other services,” says Kurt Scherf, Parks Associates’ Vice President and Principal Analyst.

The strategy for residential gateway and other CPE deployments starts with value-added features such as multiroom DVR and streaming multimedia applications, enhanced communications features, and home monitoring. Go Networks in the Home

JVC & Funai Make A Deal

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JVC and Funai Electric enter a wide-ranging business alliance in video equipment.

Not a stock and cash deal like last year’s JVC/Kenwood merger deal, this is an operating alliance where the two companies look for cost-savings in both development and production.

Funai will entrust production of LCD televisions to JVC’s factory for the Americas (in Mexico.) Funai Electric will also give the development of LCD televisions to be sold primarily in Europe to JVC by June 2008.

JVC will let Funai’s European factory in Poland produce its LCD televisions by the first half of 2008.

The two companies will jointly develop LCD televisions to be sold by JVC primarily in Europe and Americas. Funai will launch the production of these by second half of 2008.

The two will seek a joint purchasing strategy and share distribution infrastructure. They will also cooperate in production, after-sales service and environmental protection.

For more info, go JVC & Funai Deal

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